Archive | November 2013

Logitech G430 Surround Sound Gaming Headset review: Surround sound on a budget

Leather, even faux leather, comes at a premium that most headset buyers aren’t willing to shell out. Luckily, Logitech’s G430 surround-sound headset offers the same quality and comfort as the company’s $130 G35, but at a fraction of the cost ($80).

The color will catch your eye right away. Gone is the sleek black leather, replaced by your choice of bright red or vibrant blue “sports performance cloth,” which immediately drew my skepticism regarding its comfort and value. Why would I wear a spongy-feeling clamp on my head all day? Because, it turns out, it’s comfortable.

LogitechYour choice of red or blue.

The cloth is soft and gentle and never irritated or agitated my head even during prolonged use. It helps that the headset is much lighter than most competing high-performance headsets, thanks to Logitech’s decision to shove the bulky hardware into the volume controller along the cord instead of into the headset itself.

LogitechYou can choose between an analog and a USB connection.

Complementing the comfort is great sound quality. I tested the G430 with both music and 7.1 surround-sound audio and found myself thoroughly immersed as a simulated helicopter circled slowly overhead. Its bass was as prominent as the bass from an annoying car that drives down the street with its stereo turned up too loud—but the G430’s was much crisper and clearer (and without the vibrating license plate noise). My only complaint is that the headset don’t block out much noise. Everything sounds fine with audio playing, but if you’re looking to your headphones for a quiet escape, keep running.

The headset use two old-school 3.5-millimeter connectors to attach the headphones and microphone, but it includes a USB adapter for modern-port lovers. The microphone sits a comfortable distance from your mouth, but doesn’t offer much flexibility. You can turn it up and out of the way when not using it, but it doesn’t automatically mute, as the G35 does.

LogitechLogitech offers a simple inline controller for volume and microphone muting.

Unlike Logitech’s higher-end headsets, the G430 doesn’t include any programmable buttons. That’s fine for gamers who hate the hassle of setting up each toggle, switch, and knick-knack to perform some minute action; but members of the customization crowd will be disappointed. The only controls you get are a volume control wheel and a microphone mute switch on an inline panel. That’s less convenient than having the controls on the side of your head, but it also means that you won’t be crushed under the hardware’s weight.

The G430 has a lot to offer simple gamers who have an uncompromising need for comfort, quality, and a reduced price tag.

Alex Cocilova Assistant Editor, PCWorld

Alex covers desktops, everything from fancy to practical. He’s also an avid (addicted) gamer and loves following the industry.
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Source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2061295/logitech-g430-surround-sound-gaming-headset-review-surround-sound-on-a-budget.html#tk.rss_all
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Climate change scientists must turn their attention to clean skies

Climate change scientists must turn their attention to clean skies

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6-Nov-2013

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Contact: Sarah Reed
s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-4196
University of Leeds

Natural aerosols, such as emissions from volcanoes or plants, may contribute more uncertainty than previously thought to estimates of how the climate might respond to greenhouse gas emissions.

An international team of researchers, led by the University of Leeds, has shown that the effect of aerosols on the climate since industrialisation depends strongly on what the atmosphere was like before pollution when aerosols were produced only from natural emissions. The research will be published in the journal Nature on 7 November.

Professor Ken Carslaw, from the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds and lead author of the study, said: “We have shown that our poor knowledge of aerosols prior to the industrial revolution dominates the uncertainty in how aerosols have affected clouds and climate.

“In order to better understand climate change, we need to turn our attention towards understanding very clean regions of the atmosphere as might have existed in the mid-1700s. Such regions are incredibly rare now, but we are looking for them.”

Aerosols tend to increase the brightness of clouds, which would increase the reflection of solar radiation to space, thereby partially masking the climate-warming effects of greenhouse gas emissions. Firmly establishing the effect of aerosol-induced changes on cloud brightness is an important challenge for climate scientists.

In an assessment of 28 factors that could affect the uncertainties in cloud brightness, the researchers found that 45% of the variance comes from natural aerosols, compared with 34% for human-generated aerosols. (Aerosol processes, such as how quickly they are removed from the atmosphere, account for the remaining uncertainty.)

“Our results provide a clear path for scientists to reduce the uncertainty in aerosol effects on climate because we have been able to rank the causes for the uncertainty,” concludes Professor Carslaw.

###

The research was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council, the EC Seventh Framework Programme and the National Centre for Atmospheric Science.


Further information

The study, ‘Large contribution of natural aerosols to uncertainty in indirect forcing’, will be published in the journal Nature on 7 November 2013.

Professor Ken Carslaw is available for interview. Please contact Sarah Reed, Press Officer, University of Leeds on 0113 34 34196 or email s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk

University of Leeds

The University of Leeds is one of the largest higher education institutions in the UK and a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive universities.

The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise showed the University of Leeds to be the UK’s eighth biggest research powerhouse and the University’s vision is to secure a place among the world’s leading universities by 2015. http://www.leeds.ac.uk


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Climate change scientists must turn their attention to clean skies

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

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]


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Contact: Sarah Reed
s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-4196
University of Leeds

Natural aerosols, such as emissions from volcanoes or plants, may contribute more uncertainty than previously thought to estimates of how the climate might respond to greenhouse gas emissions.

An international team of researchers, led by the University of Leeds, has shown that the effect of aerosols on the climate since industrialisation depends strongly on what the atmosphere was like before pollution when aerosols were produced only from natural emissions. The research will be published in the journal Nature on 7 November.

Professor Ken Carslaw, from the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds and lead author of the study, said: “We have shown that our poor knowledge of aerosols prior to the industrial revolution dominates the uncertainty in how aerosols have affected clouds and climate.

“In order to better understand climate change, we need to turn our attention towards understanding very clean regions of the atmosphere as might have existed in the mid-1700s. Such regions are incredibly rare now, but we are looking for them.”

Aerosols tend to increase the brightness of clouds, which would increase the reflection of solar radiation to space, thereby partially masking the climate-warming effects of greenhouse gas emissions. Firmly establishing the effect of aerosol-induced changes on cloud brightness is an important challenge for climate scientists.

In an assessment of 28 factors that could affect the uncertainties in cloud brightness, the researchers found that 45% of the variance comes from natural aerosols, compared with 34% for human-generated aerosols. (Aerosol processes, such as how quickly they are removed from the atmosphere, account for the remaining uncertainty.)

“Our results provide a clear path for scientists to reduce the uncertainty in aerosol effects on climate because we have been able to rank the causes for the uncertainty,” concludes Professor Carslaw.

###

The research was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council, the EC Seventh Framework Programme and the National Centre for Atmospheric Science.


Further information

The study, ‘Large contribution of natural aerosols to uncertainty in indirect forcing’, will be published in the journal Nature on 7 November 2013.

Professor Ken Carslaw is available for interview. Please contact Sarah Reed, Press Officer, University of Leeds on 0113 34 34196 or email s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk

University of Leeds

The University of Leeds is one of the largest higher education institutions in the UK and a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive universities.

The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise showed the University of Leeds to be the UK’s eighth biggest research powerhouse and the University’s vision is to secure a place among the world’s leading universities by 2015. http://www.leeds.ac.uk


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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/uol-ccs110513.php
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Climbing Frozen Waterfalls at Night by the Light of a Drone

Climbing Frozen Waterfalls at Night by the Light of a Drone

The work of photographer Thomas Senf is the focus of a short video hosted by The Guardian, documenting the stunning lengths he’s gone through to shoot climbers scaling frozen waterfalls at night in the mountains of Norway. The landscape is a like a chandelier lit from within—a reef of glowing ice.

Read more…

    



Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/T2ZaFavHwA0/climbing-frozen-waterfalls-at-night-by-the-light-of-a-d-1459406383
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Prognostic value of baseline HRQOL for survival for 11 types of cancer pointed out by EORTC study

Prognostic value of baseline HRQOL for survival for 11 types of cancer pointed out by EORTC study[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

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Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Results of an EORTC study published in Cancer point out the prognostic value of baseline recorded health-related quality of life for survival for eleven types of cancer: brain, breast, colorectal, esophageal, head and neck, lung, melanoma, ovarian, pancreatic, prostate, and testicular cancer. For each cancer site, at least one health-related quality of life parameter provided additional prognostic information over and above the clinical and sociodemographic variables.

Dr. Andrew Bottomley, EORTC Headquarters Associate Director says, “This study utilized a single standardized and validated patient self-assessment tool, the EORTC Core Quality of Life Questionnaire, or the QLQ-C30 for short. We selected thirty EORTC randomized controlled trials which involved eleven different cancer sites for this study. This effort included questionnaires completed by 7417 patients prior to their being randomized into one of these studies.”

The health-related quality of life parameters that were found to be predictive for survival were: cognitive functioning for brain cancer; physical functioning, emotional functioning, global health status, and nausea and vomiting for breast cancer; physical functioning, nausea and vomiting, pain, and appetite loss for colorectal cancer; physical functioning and social functioning for esophageal cancer; emotional functioning, nausea and vomiting, and dyspnea for head and neck cancer; physical functioning and pain for lung cancer; physical functioning for melanoma; nausea and vomiting for ovarian cancer; global health status for pancreatic cancer; role functioning and appetite loss for prostate cancer; role functioning for testicular cancer.

Models were adjusted for age, sex, and World Health Organization performance status and were stratified by distant metastasis. For each cancer type, univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to assess the prognostic value (P

###

This EORTC research was supported by an unrestricted grant from the Pfizer Foundation, the EORTC Charitable Trust, and by the United States of America National Cancer Institute. One of the authors, Divine E. Ediebah was supported by a Belgian Cancer Foundation Grant.



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Prognostic value of baseline HRQOL for survival for 11 types of cancer pointed out by EORTC study[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

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Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Results of an EORTC study published in Cancer point out the prognostic value of baseline recorded health-related quality of life for survival for eleven types of cancer: brain, breast, colorectal, esophageal, head and neck, lung, melanoma, ovarian, pancreatic, prostate, and testicular cancer. For each cancer site, at least one health-related quality of life parameter provided additional prognostic information over and above the clinical and sociodemographic variables.

Dr. Andrew Bottomley, EORTC Headquarters Associate Director says, “This study utilized a single standardized and validated patient self-assessment tool, the EORTC Core Quality of Life Questionnaire, or the QLQ-C30 for short. We selected thirty EORTC randomized controlled trials which involved eleven different cancer sites for this study. This effort included questionnaires completed by 7417 patients prior to their being randomized into one of these studies.”

The health-related quality of life parameters that were found to be predictive for survival were: cognitive functioning for brain cancer; physical functioning, emotional functioning, global health status, and nausea and vomiting for breast cancer; physical functioning, nausea and vomiting, pain, and appetite loss for colorectal cancer; physical functioning and social functioning for esophageal cancer; emotional functioning, nausea and vomiting, and dyspnea for head and neck cancer; physical functioning and pain for lung cancer; physical functioning for melanoma; nausea and vomiting for ovarian cancer; global health status for pancreatic cancer; role functioning and appetite loss for prostate cancer; role functioning for testicular cancer.

Models were adjusted for age, sex, and World Health Organization performance status and were stratified by distant metastasis. For each cancer type, univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to assess the prognostic value (P

###

This EORTC research was supported by an unrestricted grant from the Pfizer Foundation, the EORTC Charitable Trust, and by the United States of America National Cancer Institute. One of the authors, Divine E. Ediebah was supported by a Belgian Cancer Foundation Grant.



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AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/eofr-pvo110613.php
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German art hoard held unknown Chagall, Matisse

AUGSBURG, Germany (AP) — It started with a routine check by German tax inspectors — and resulted in the discovery of an art hoard so vast and spectacular that no one yet knows how the story truly ends.

On a high-speed train from Zurich to Munich on Sept. 22, 2010, Germany’s briskly polite officialdom was on the lookout for customs and tax cheats. Thousands of German citizens had bank accounts in Switzerland, many of them undeclared, and the route from Zurich was a prime target for those carrying substantial sums of cash.

One elderly man on the train raised their suspicions and prosecutors launched a preliminary tax probe against him.

Two years later, in February 2012, the trail led to the man’s apartment in a wealthy district of Munich. Once inside, inspectors found a far more glittering prize than smuggled cash or evaded taxes: a huge collection of hidden artwork that sheds new light on some of the 20th-century’s master painters and reawakens painful memories of Germany’s Nazi past.

The paintings, drawings, engravings, woodcuts and prints numbered more than 1,400 in all and were created by an all-star roster of modern art: Marc Chagall, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Oskar Kokoschka, and leading German artists Otto Dix, Max Liebermann, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. At least one older work was in the trove: a 16th-century engraving of the Crucifixion by Albrecht Duerer.

Some pieces — ones by Matisse, Chagall, Dix — were previously unknown, not listed in the detailed inventories compiled by art scholars.

Investigators’ excitement at the find was tempered by a disturbing question. At least some of the works had apparently been seized by the Nazis — so who were they taken from and who now are their rightful owners?

At a news conference Tuesday in Augsburg, Germany, prosecutors wouldn’t identify the elderly suspect, citing tax secrecy laws and the ongoing investigation. They did say he hasn’t asked for the artwork back and that they were not currently in contact with him.

Prosecutors are probing whether he improperly acquired the works, but no charges have been filed and prosecutors say there may not be any.

Although prosecutors didn’t name the suspect, heirs of the late Jewish collector Alfred Flechtheim issued a statement saying the case raised “justifiable suspicions” that some works the Nazis had taken from him might have been bought by Hildebrand Gurlitt, an art dealer who acted for the Nazis.

A Max Beckmann painting that once belonged to Flechtheim was sold two years ago through the Lempertz auction house in Cologne. A legal adviser for Lempertz, Karl-Sax Feddersen, told The Associated Press that the seller was Gurlitt’s son Cornelius.

The German magazine Focus also reported that Cornelius Gurlitt was the man under investigation.

Neither Cornelius Gurlitt nor his lawyer could immediately be reached for comment Tuesday.

The mystery now turns to the art.

The 121 framed and 1,285 unframed works found in one room at the apartment were “professionally stored and in a very good condition,” said Siegfried Kloeble, head of the customs investigations office in Munich. He said it took a specialist company three days to remove the paintings; officials refused to say where they are being kept now.

Investigators, aided by a leading art historian, are trying to establish the artworks’ legal status and history. So far, officials said they have done at least preliminary research on only about 500 of the pieces.

It’s unclear how many of the works might be subject to return to pre-World War II owners.

Speaking at the news conference, prosecutor Reinhard Nemetz said investigators have turned up “concrete evidence” that the find includes both works that the Nazis classed as “degenerate art” and seized from German museums in 1937 or shortly after, and other works that may have been taken from individuals. The Nazis often forced Jewish collectors to sell their art at pitifully low prices to German dealers or simply took them.

“Degenerate art” was largely modern or abstract works that Adolf Hitler’s regime believed to be a corrupt influence on the German people. Many such works were later sold to enrich the Nazis. An art expert working with prosecutors said those sales are legally valid, even if other works in the collection may eventually be found to belong to survivors of Nazi persecution or their heirs.

The Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany called for the works to be made public immediately so families of Holocaust victims could locate and recover art that had been taken from them. The conference also said that art for which heirs could not be found “must not remain with Cornelius Gurlitt, the son of a Nazi-affiliated art dealer who profited from art confiscated from Holocaust victims or sold under duress.”

It said any unclaimed art should be auctioned and the money used for assistance to Holocaust survivors or Holocaust education.

Nemetz defended the delay in making the find public and rejected calls to make images immediately available on the Internet to help potential owners, citing copyright and security concerns.

Art historian Meike Hoffmann, an expert on “degenerate art” at the Free University of Berlin, offered a glimpse of some of the works during a slide show at the same news conference.

She showed works she said had not been known to scholars, or known only from documents without any photos to give an idea what the works looked like.

“Such cases are of high importance to art historians,” she explained.

One Matisse painting of a woman, seized by the Nazis in France during World War II, is not in the established catalog of his works, she noted. A Chagall gouache of an allegorical scene also isn’t among the artist’s listed works. Experts haven’t yet been able to determine where the Chagall came from, she said.

Other works, such as an unknown self-portrait by 20th-century German artist Otto Dix or a woodcut by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, added new breadth to what’s known about the artists, Hoffmann added.

Some were known works that appeared to have been legally sold, although their recent whereabouts may have been unknown. For instance, a previously listed work by Courbet of a girl with a goat made its way into the collection through an auction in 1949 — years after the end of World War II. A Franz Marc work, “Landscape with Horses,” was identified as coming from an art museum in Moritzburg, Germany.

Overall, Hoffmann was elated with the quality and the depth of the find.

“When you stand in front of the works, see the ones that were long thought to have been lost or destroyed and in a relatively good state — some of them dirty but not damaged — you have an incredible feeling of happiness,” she told reporters.

__

Frank Jordans and Geir Moulson in Berlin also contributed.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/german-art-hoard-held-unknown-chagall-matisse-150953987.html
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Chuck Liddell vs. military body armor (video)

Retired UFC legend Chuck Liddell found himself in the audience of some military personal recently. For some reason, the incomprehensible phenomenon of fans wanting fighters to hurt them for photos/videos occurred once more. We’ve seen this before, specifically with Liddell.

There’s a certain type of fan that evidently gets a *ahem* kick out of asking professional fighters to punch them, kick them and choke them. To them, it’s funny, we guess. To us, it would just be downright scary.

At least the latest fan turned punching bag had the quasi legitimate confidence boost of wearing body armor when he asked Liddell to kick him in the torso. It didn’t seem to do the soldier much good when Liddell hit him with a spinning back kick.

Chuck Liddell kick – 1, military body armor – 0. Check out the video above from the UFC’s television host Megan Olivi and see for yourself. Any psychologists out there, feel free to try and explain to Cagewriter the thinking behind asking pro fighters to hit you, uncontested. We’re stumped.

After the jump, our all time favorite fighter hitting fan videos – both featuring Alistair Overeem. Whereas Liddell specializes in obliging drunk fans and idiot radio show hosts, Overeem specializes in kicking little girls and punching female reporters. Really.

Alistair Overeem kicks little girl:


Alistair Overeem gut punches female reporter:

Follow Elias on Twitter @EliasCepeda

Source: http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/mma-cagewriter/video-ufc-chuck-liddell-vs-military-body-armor-170116681–mma.html
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Jay Z Holds Blue Ivy While Swimming in Sweet Father-Daughter Photo

Father-daughter bonding with Blue! Beyonce recently shared a sweet new photo on her Tumblr page of husband Jay Z and their daughter, Blue Ivy, going swimming together.

PHOTOS: Blue Ivy’s baby album

In the snapshot, the 43-year-old rapper holds his nearly 22-month-old baby girl high above his head while standing ankle-deep in a shallow pool of water. The infinity pool, surrounded by palm trees, overlooks the ocean and beautiful blue sky. In the silhouette photo, Jay Z appears to be wearing tropical swim trunks and a white T-shirt, while his daughter also wears a little swimsuit.

PHOTOS: Jay Z and Beyonce’s sexy romance

Jay Z seems to have a very special bond with his adorable little girl. In the November issue of Vanity Fair, the rapper said Blue is in love with his twelfth studio album, Magna Carta . . . Holy Grail.

“She does like her mother’s music — she watches [Beyonce’s concerts] on the computer every night. But my album came out and I don’t know if Blue ever heard any of my music prior to this album — she’s only 18 months old and I don’t play my music around the house,” Jay Z explained. “But this album was new, so we played it. And she loves all the songs. She plays a song and she goes, ‘More, Daddy, more . . . Daddy song.'”

PHOTOS: Hollywood’s star dads

“She’s my biggest fan. If no one bought the Magna Carta [album], the fact that she loves it so much, it gives me the greatest joy,” he said. “And that’s not like a cliche. I’m really serious. Just to see her — ‘Daddy song, more, Daddy.’ She’s genuine, she’s honest, because she doesn’t know it makes me happy. She just wants to hear it.”

Source: http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-moms/news/jay-z-holds-blue-ivy-while-swimming-in-sweet-father-daughter-photo-2013411
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